Reviews / 23.10.2018

They say truth is stranger than fiction, and that's especially evident in Can You Ever Forgive Me?, the delightfully absurd and deliciously bizarre true story of a washed-up writer who discovers a knack for forgery and a strangely fulfilling career change she never saw coming. Mining the as-yet untapped but mightily impressive dramatic talents of comedic superstar Melissa McCarthy, this may be her career change you're not expecting either. Following in the footsteps of other comedians who flipped their waning comical image (with Life of the Party and The Happytime Murders,...

Reviews / 21.10.2018

Whenever we're presented with a film depicting the events surrounding a true-life terrorist attack, one has to ask if there is a greater purpose in making such a piece of cinema. Is this merely exploitation or is there something more to it? Through this kind of film, we may learn of acts of heroism and sacrifice not found in the headlines covering the incident or better understand how the event itself actually unfolded. Some examples of this genre do nothing more than recreating a moment in history few...

Reviews / 19.10.2018

Once a mainstay of Hollywood, the Western genre seemingly faded away in the late 1960s. In the last few decades, several filmmakers have made concerted efforts to keep the tales of the wild, wild west alive, in both traditional and non-traditional ways. Working very much in the former, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, the latest from writer/director duo Joel and Ethan Coen, is a six-part anthology with all the black humour, brutal violence, and gorgeous imagery we've come to expect from the Coen Brothers. Cinema purists may ponder if this can...

Reviews / 17.10.2018

The world of cinema loves to tackle the devastating effects of substance addiction. The life and times of a drug addict provide weighty fodder for any potential screenplay, particularly those which also seek to portray an addict's loved ones, as they watch helplessly from the sidelines. In writer/director Felix van Groeningen's compelling but frustrating Beautiful Boy, the tale is mostly told from the perspective of a beleaguered father, rather than the titular addict himself. It's a curious twist on this all-too-familiar tale, and one likely being lived by thousands of...

Reviews / 16.10.2018

It's always hard to say goodbye to a legend. When Robert Redford announced The Old Man & the Gun would be his final acting performance (although he's since slightly backed away from this comment), there were plenty who didn't want to see him go. Redford has been a stalwart of cinema for almost six decades now, and he's still giving us stellar work at the age of 82. But, if he is to stick to his word and this is to be his farewell, he's going out on a charming...

Reviews / 14.10.2018

A filmmaker at the top of his craft. An autobiographical narrative featuring the people, language, and locales of his homeland, all captured in mesmerising black-and-white cinematography. A simple yet powerful familial story where ordinary moments somehow become entirely extraordinary. An ineffaceable homage to Mexico City in the 1970s. This is Alfonso Cuarón's Roma, one of the year's most stunning achievements in cinema. When crafted by an expert, the simplest tales often become the most powerful and affecting. This rings especially true of Cuarón's latest masterwork.  There's little grandeur here. In its...