Reviews / 30.04.2020

Since bursting onto the small screen in 2003 with the criminally underrated Nip/Tuck, writer/director/producer Ryan Murphy has been a dominant force in Tinsel Town, creating some of the best and worst (Scream Queens, anyone?) television shows of the last 17 years. With a penchant for crafting stories centred on minority groups the industry so often ignores, Murphy has blazed a fervent trail to shake up a town still set in the ways of eras gone by. In perhaps his boldest offering to date, Murphy and co-creator Ian Brennan formulate...

Awards Season, Reviews / 29.10.2019

After his recent comments on Marvel movies sent Film Twitter into a misguided and absurd frenzy, Martin Scorsese is back to grabbing headlines for all the right reasons. With a reported budget of $160 million, a production time of over two years, and a three-and-a-half-hour runtime, The Irishman is one of Scorsese's (and Netflix's) biggest gambles to date. Thankfully, it all pays off handsomely. Returning to the gangster genre his career has been intrinsically linked with, Scorsese proves once again why he's one of the greatest filmmakers of all time....

Awards Season, Reviews / 28.10.2019

Sometimes, a movie star disappears, never to be heard from again. Occasionally, it's more an extended break before a stellar comeback performance to put them right back on the map. We've seen that once already this year, with Renée Zellweger making a roaring return in Judy. Now it's time for the glorious resurrection of Eddie Murphy, in a performance that's the best thing he's offered in more than a decade. After a string of disastrous failures which led to four (!) Razzie Award nominations in just six (!!) years,...

Awards Season, Reviews / 13.10.2019

Way back in 1996, Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet twisted a classic piece of Shakespeare's work into something palatable enough for mainstream audiences to lap up, particularly teenage girls currently fawning over a young Leonardo DiCaprio. Taking equal inspiration from a piece of Shakespeare and with this generation's teen dream Timothée Chalamet at its helm, David Michôd's The King might just unintentionally pull in a similar crowd. Whereas Luhrmann's work was a direct (albeit wildly unique) Shakespearean adaptation, The King blazes its own daring trail by leaving Shakespeare's infamous iambic pentameter behind,...

Reviews / 19.10.2018

Once a mainstay of Hollywood, the Western genre seemingly faded away in the late 1960s. In the last few decades, several filmmakers have made concerted efforts to keep the tales of the wild, wild west alive, in both traditional and non-traditional ways. Working very much in the former, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, the latest from writer/director duo Joel and Ethan Coen, is a six-part anthology with all the black humour, brutal violence, and gorgeous imagery we've come to expect from the Coen Brothers. Cinema purists may ponder if this can...